How can this be??

Hi, Everyone!

Thornton Prayer sent a couple of ChangeGrids over to us and asked what our take was on the differences between the two.

The two ChangeGrids cover the same activity list and were completed by the same respondent 45 minutes apart (I have no idea why) — and the plottings SEEM to be quite different, leading the client to question the accuracy of the ChangeGrid. How can this be?

Let’s start with a QUICK GLANCE at the two ChangeGrids:

QuickGrid1

Initial set of responses (CLICK to view full-size)

QuickGrid2

Second set of responses (CLICK here for full-size)

First thing I notice is that, even though the individual items have migrated a bit, the overall “energy” of the two ChangeGrids is very similar. They both reflect a moderate to moderately-high level of Ability and a moderately-high to high level of Challenge across the same 8 out of the 10 activities on the list, placing the respondent in the upper half of Power, shifted appreciably OutGrid.  This indicates that overall, the respondent is energized, engaging and motivated — an “Expressive Driver” — when it comes to the majority of the activities listed.

That being said, in every activity, the respondent’s perceptions did shift in the seemingly short period of time that passed between the completion of the two ChangeGrids.

So what are we to make of that?

Well … it’s not surprising in the least — in fact, it’s NORMAL.

Remember that the ChangeGrid is a DYNAMIC tool — exploring STATES (that change), not TRAITS (that don’t). We recognize that everyone is in a constant state of physical, emotional and intellectual flux, experiencing an ever-changing mosaic of perceptions about ALL of the countless items on the BIG ChangeGrid they carry around in their HEADS.

EVERY ACTIVITY IS IN CONSTANT MOTION

That said, I’d like to point out that in this case, nothing JUMPED to the other side of the ChangeGrid — the movements were actually rather subtle.

Take a look at the responses the client provided:

Responses1

Initial set of responses (CLICK to view full-size)

Responses2

Second set of responses (CLICK here for full-size)

Now, I’m no statistician — and TRULY, I have NEVER looked at a ChangeGrid in this way before — but here’s my take on the results:

Every activity experienced a change in at least one dimension. Looking at the dimensional level first, the changes were as follow:

ABILITY SUMMARY:

TOTAL ABILITY IN CHANGEGRID #1: 80 POINTS

TOTAL ABILITY IN CHANGEGRID #2: 78 POINTS

TOTAL CHANGE IN ABILITY: -2 POINTS

ABILITY DETAIL:

ABILITY UNCHANGED: 4 ACTIVITIES

ABILITY UP BY 1 POINT: 1 ACTIVITY

ABILITY UP BY 2 POINTS: 1 ACTIVITY

ABILITY DOWN BY 1 POINT: 3 ACTIVITIES

ABILITY DOWN BY 2 POINTS: 1 ACTIVITY

40% of the Activity ratings remained unchanged, and another 40% changed by only 1 point. That’s quite a subtle shift. Ability overall dropped by a total of 2 points.

——————————

CHALLENGE SUMMARY:

TOTAL CHALLENGE IN CHANGEGRID 1: 96 POINTS

TOTAL CHALLENGE IN CHANGEGRID 2: 91 POINTS

TOTAL CHANGE IN CHALLENGE: -5 POINTS

CHALLENGE DETAIL:

CHALLENGE UNCHANGED: 3 ACTIVITIES

CHALLENGE UP BY 1 POINT: 2 ACTIVITIES

CHALLENGE DOWN BY 1 POINT: 4 ACTIVITIES

CHALLENGE DOWN BY 2 POINTS: 1 ACTIVITY

30% of the Challenge ratings remained unchanged, and another 60% changed by only 1 point — and that’s quite subtle too.  The total change for Challenge was an decrease of 5 points.

——————————

IMPORTANCE SUMMARY:

TOTAL IMPORTANCE IN CHANGEGRID #1: 90

TOTAL IMPORTANCE IN CHANGEGRID #1: 99

TOTAL CHANGE IN IMPORTANCE: +9 POINTS

IMPORTANCE DETAIL:

IMPORTANCE UNCHANGED: 5

IMPORTANCE UP BY 2 POINTS: 2

IMPORTANCE UP BY 3 POINTS: 2

IMPORTANCE DOWN BY 1 POINT: 1

50% of the Importance ratings remained unchanged, and another 10% changed by only 1 point — so there’s nothing much to say about that, BUT in 40% of the activities, the rating of Importance increased by 2 and even 3 points, and THAT is pretty significant.

So what does all of that mean?

During the interval between the two ChangeGrids, something happened with the respondent that resulted in a slight (and in my opinion, negligible) movement InGrid, but LOOK at what happened to Perceived Importance — a HUGE increase!

We’ve always known that the act of filling out a ChangeGrid affects your level of tension. Is it possible that completing the first ChangeGrid really got the respondent thinking about the activities and triggered a bit of self-coaching that resulted in these generally subtle (and in the case of Importance, profound) changes?  I think so.

One last thing I’d like to draw your attention to — Activity #1: “Marketing my services successfully.”  The second plotting reflects the most significant change across the entire set — a movement that reflects increased focus, confidence and a stronger drive to achieve. That’s definitely a step in the right direction!

What do you think?

– T –

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2 Responses to How can this be??

  1. dadoften says:

    I doubt I could fill out a 10 activity change grid the same way twice if I was being honest, trying my hardest, and knew that I was going to be doing it twice in 45 minutes.

    I agree. It actually looks very stable. No problem there.

  2. Daniel says:

    Brings light to the old saw, “Let me give this a another look,” literally to reconsider my initial response. The brain does not stop at the first level of word meaning but keeps having thoughts (making connections)until the initial matrix of neurons has quieted (no more issues, of firm mind) on the subject.

    The ChangGrid creates issues for the brain to sort out. First by postulating a hidden-‘I’ affirmation regarding future outcomes and then by forcing a response on two or three parameters: challenge, ability, importance.

    Given the unique nature of the ChangeGrid, it is highly probable that the first Survey produced a more naive response than the second. The first produced learning by challenging the client’s beliefs, attitudes, and understandings or ‘take’ on the meanings of the listed items. In effect, completing the ChangeGrid the fist time caused the client to think about it again producing a change in state and of mind as noted in the second survey, a new take on some items and less so on others.

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